NEMO-Online Vol. 6 No. 10 is online / Mise en ligne de NEMO-Online Vol. 6 n°10

English

NEMO-Online is delighted to announce the publication of issue No. 10, with three articles by Amine Beyhom (English), Jean During (English) and Hanene Gharbi (حنان الغربي Arabic).

Amine Beyhom: Further Analyses from the VIAMAP,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 6 10 |2021-11| p. 5–36.

The article is a sequel to two already published articles, “MAT for the VIAMAP” and “The Lost Art of Maqām”, with 4 new video analyses and two explicative videos.

“[With this article and analyses, the author has] opened a completely novel way of scientific enquiry in musicology.”

Wim van der Meer

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Jean During: An Indo-Persian musical treatise: The Tebb-e Dārā Shokuhi, 1646,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 6 10 |2021-11| p. 37–46.

The Tebb-e Dārā Shokuhi is a medical treatise written by a Persian scholar of the Mughal court. It includes a chapter on the art of music considered in particular for its therapeutic properties. The article highlights principal points of this text and identifies its many borrowings from earlier music treaties. The author, who was born in India, had the opportunity to compile these sources, which attest of the wide diffusion in Northern India of the Persian musical culture and of the Greater Khorasan.

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Hanene Gharbi (حنان الغربي): تحليل الخطاب الموسيقي لمحمد عبد الوهّاب من خلال أغنية أنت عمري”, Near Eastern Musicology Online 6 10 |2021-11| p. 47–87.

The author proposes a stylistic study of the song “Anta ʿUmrī” composed par Muḥammad ʿAbd-al-Wahhāb and sung by Umm Kulthūm. Through techniques used by the composer along with Kulthūm’s interpretation, she demonstrates the coexistence within the song of traditional and modern elements. Additionally, she proposes the complete score of a performance of this song which is accessible on the web.

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Français

Nemo-Online a le plaisir d’annoncer la publication du n°10 de la revue, avec trois articles par Amine Beyhom (en Anglais), Jean During (en Anglais) et Hanene Gharbi (حنان الغربي en Arabe).

Amine Beyhom: Further Analyses from the VIAMAP,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 6 10 |2021-11(04)| p. 5–36.

L’article est la continuation de deux précédents articles par l’auteur, “MAT for the VIAMAP” et “The Lost Art of Maqām”, avec 4 nouvelles analyses vidéo et deux vidéos explicatives.

“[Avec cet article et ces analyses, l’auteur] a initié une méthode complètement nouvelle d’investigation scientifique en musicologie.”

Wim van der Meer

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Jean During: An Indo-Persian musical treatise: The Tebb-e Dārā Shokuhi, 1646,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 6 10 |2021-11| p. 37–46.

Le Tebb-e Dārā Shokuhi est un traité de médecine d’un Persan de la cour moghole. Il comporte un chapitre sur l’art musical envisagé notamment pour ses propriétés thérapeutiques. L’article fait ressortir les points originaux de ce texte et relève ses nombreux emprunts à des traités de musique antérieurs. L’auteur, qui était né en Inde, avait eu la possibilité de compiler ces sources, ce qui témoigne de la large diffusion en Inde du Nord de la culture musicale de Perse et du Grand Khorasan.

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Hanene Gharbi (حنان الغربي): تحليل الخطاب الموسيقي لمحمد عبد الوهّاب من خلال أغنية أنت عمري”, Near Eastern Musicology Online 6 10 |2021-11| p. 47–87.

L’auteure propose une étude de style sur la chanson “Anta ʿUmrī” composée par Muḥammad ʿAbd-al-Wahhāb et chantée par Umm Kulthūm. Elle démontre, à travers les techniques employées par le compositeur – alliées à l’interprétation de la chanteuse –, une coexistence au sein de la chanson entre phrasés traditionnels et modernes. Elle propose également la partition complète d’une interprétation de cette chanson accessible sur internet.

Release of Eight Video-Analyses of Byzantine Scales performed by Four Lebanese Cantors

These Eight Video-analyses of the scales of Byzantine chant (for the scales of the Eight modes) are proposed on a dedicated main page. The analyses come originally from the book of Amine Beyhom Théories et pratiques de l’échelle dans le chant byzantin arabe : Une approche comparative et analytique proposant une solution inédite pour le système théorique de Chrysanthos le Madyte and were edited for video.

Four Lebanese cantors of Byzantine chant – Fr. Nicolas Malek, Fr. Makarios Haidamous, Joseph Yazbeck and a cantor who preferred to remain anonymous – accepted to record (among other performances) the scales of the eight canonical modes of their liturgical chant for research purposes. Each of them is a renowned soloist and choir director in Lebanon.

Opening Screen of the video for the First Byzantine Mode

The complete results of the analyses of these recordings are proposed in the aforementioned book, while particular results concerning the first mode were presented on various occasions in Greece and in Cyprus, but also in France, Tunisia and in Lebanon.

The analyses in the videos are based on these presentations, which in turn were based on power point animations proposed in the aforementioned book.

Each video comprises a short theoretical introduction contextualizing the scales of the current mode within the general frame of the 19th-Century Second Reform of Byzantine chant.

Example of a slide with explanations on the scale of the First Byzantine Mode according to the teaching of Thrasyvoulos Stanitsas

Moreover, the first video (for the First mode) features a General Introduction which explains shortly:

  • The solmization of the Byzantine – and equivalences between Byzantine and Western – degrees of the scale
Byzantine chant solmization with transliteration and equivalences with the degrees of the Western Common-Practice scale
  • The accidentals used in the theory of the Second Reform (and in the Western/Byzantine notation proposed by the author)
Accidentals used in the theory of Byzantine Chant (19th-Century Second Reform) with equivalents in fractions of the tone (including cents)
  • The scores and literal notations
Western/Byzantine and literal notations of scales
  • (And) Explanations about the graphic representation of the results
Conventions used for the Graphic notations of scales

The videos on the main page are in High resolution, and also available on the YouTube Channell of CERMAA. An alternate, Low resolution version is proposed for each mode (and the Intro) in a dedicated page.

Imagine: A Scientific Fantasy 2 ‎–‎ A video-analysis in 3D of Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar

This 47th video-analysis of the VIAMAP series is an anniversary video to commemorate the beginning of video-analyses at the CERMAA. It features 3D graphical techniques as well as a short introduction explaining the scale(s) used in the analysis. It is a sequel to the 46th video-analysis –‎ the first in the 3D series –‎ the publication of which is delayed. It is also a 3D remake of the first video-analysis by the CERMAA, featuring an alternate take of Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar and arranged by Richard Dumbrill, Amine Beyhom and Rosy Azar Beyhom in 2012. Further details are explained below (the scale) and in the video as such, as well as in the original post for the first video-analysis.

Explanations about the graphic scale used for the 3D video-analysis of Hurrian Song H6 3D performed by Lara Jokhadar

The last sequence preceding the end credits proposes the following text:

now imagine what it would be if we could apply 3D graphic analysis and animation to all aspects and characteristics of sound; stop, rewind, slow down the music and animation at will, zoom in, zoom out, keep selected characteristics and look up each and all details from the desired point of view and, finally, apply all these to the analysis of multi-part music, with each part shown separately, or together with other parts…

Amine Beyhom, “Imagine A scientific fantasy”

3D video-analysis of Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar: take 4 recorded on the 21st of October 2012 by Amine Beyhom


A CERMAA production

Video Analysis (https://youtu.be/L2c5-IHOmTc)


Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by Joseph Yazbeck in 2011

Two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2012 by Joseph Yazbeck. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by Joseph Yazbeck (below)

  • Arabic Version by Joseph Yazbeck (below)

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by fr. Nicolas Malek in 2011

Release by CERMAA of two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2011 by fr. Nicolas Malek. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by fr. Nicolas Malek (below)

  • Arabic Version by fr. Nicolas Malek (below)

New page by CERMAA dedicated to Video Analyses of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios

A new page, dedicated to different versions of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios has been added to the site of the CERMAA.
Kyrie Ekekraxa is a well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul). The chant is in the 8th mode (on Νη=c)  of the Byzantine Church (equivalent to maqām Rāst in Arabian music), with an incursion (a modulation) in the 2nd mode (“Mild chromatic”).

Most of the audio recordings analyzed in the videos on this page were originally published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584), with Power Point animations for four Lebanese cantors, together with Greek versions of this chant (8 versions in all, with detailed analyses of two excerpts each undertaken in the aforementioned book). Two other recordings were undertaken with a fifth Lebanese cantor: it was too late however to analyze them as the book was already under print. The two additional recordings were also published as audio recordings in the accompanying CD-Rom of the book.

All these should be (re)analysed and published on this dedicated page.

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by an Anonymous Cantor in 2011

Release by CERMAA of two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2011 by an Anonymous Cantor. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by Anonymous (below)


 

  • Arabic Version by Anonymous (below)

Release of CERMAA Video of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed in Greek by fr. Makarios Haidamous in 2012

This the Greek version (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2012 by fr. Makarios Haidamous. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.

Compare with the version in Arabic by the same cantor at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/933.

 

Release of CERMAA Video of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed by fr Makarios Haidamous 2012

The CERMAA is delighted to publish this video animation (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, a well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul). This animation relates to a performance in 2012 by fr. Makarios Haidamous, with the text in Arabic language. The audio was published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584), with Power Point animations for four Lebanese cantors (including fr. Makarios Haidamous), together with Greek versions of this chant (8 versions in all). Two other recordings were undertaken with a fifth Lebanese cantor: it was however too late to analyze them as the book was already under print. The two additional recordings were published as audio recordings in the accompanying CD-Rom of the book.
This is the second video animation based on Pitch analysis with the Praat program that the CERMAA publishes on the internet. The first video was the Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar (http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/926). A series of video animations of different versions of Kyrie Ekekraxa should be made available during the year 2018. The aim of this series is to demonstrate the variety of interpretations of one chant by different cantors.
As with Lara’s animation for H6, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.

Release of HURRIAN SONG 6 (H6) by CERMAA (DUMBRILL/BEYHOM/AZAR-BEYHOM) performed by Lara Jokhadar

Release of the first animated video produced at CERMAA.
HURRIAN SONG 6 (H6) was arranged by Richard Dumbrill, Amine Beyhom and Rosy Azar Beyhom in 2012, and performed by Lara Jokhadar.
The video (below) shows the Pitch analysis of Lara’s voice with Praat, in two sections (upper and lower). The upper section offers a general view, while the lower section shows the detailed analysis, with horizontal red dashed lines showing the tonic and the octave, blue dashed line for the fifth and green for the fourth.
Special thanks to Wim van der Meer and to Kabalan Samaha for their help in producing this first video.