CERMAA Director Amine Beyhom awarded the 2017 Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi Prize / Le prix 2017 Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi décerné au Directeur du CERMAA Amine Beyhom

English

We are delighted at CERMAA to announce that Amine Beyhom, director of the CERMAA, was awarded on the 28th of October 2017, by the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi Prize for the year 2017. The prize is awarded every three years.

The video of the presentation speech is available at https://www.facebook.com/TheSocietyForEthnomusicology/videos/1601780733223099/ : 1:27:20-1:29:04. (The excerpt can be directly watched at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SEM_2017-General-Membership-Meeting-1601780733223099-12.mp4)

Transcribed excerpt from Katherine Butler Schofield’s presentation speech:

It’s an enormous privilege in this year, of all years, to announce the winner of the 2017 Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi prize, which is bestowed to recognize the scholarly contributions of an individual music scholar or music institution in the Islamic world. The committee, constituted by Laudan Nooshin as chair […] and other members, which are Jonathan Glasser and myself, we are delighted to award the Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi prize this year to Amine Beyhom […]. Amine Beyhom is an impressive Lebanese scholar who has taken on a broad comparison project that links musical traditions that are at the historical heart of the Islamic world. He has engaged seriously with a huge geographical and historical range of musical practices, and has built up a broad network of colleagues in the Arabic speaking world and in France. He has clearly had a long-term influence on musicology and ethnomusicology, and giving him this award is both an honor for him, and an opportunity for him to engage more closely with English-speaking colleagues, particularly in the growing field of historical ethnomusicology. And as well as the work in itself, we were impressed by the number and range of letters that we received in support of his nomination. Please, give him a round of applause, in absentia [applause].

Amine Beyhom would like to express his heartfelt thanks to all the persons and institutions who nominated him for this prize.

 

Français

Le CERMAA a le plaisir d’annoncer qu’Amine Beyhom, directeur du CERMAA, a reçu le 28 Octobre 2017, de la Society for Ethnomusicology, le Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi pour l’année 2017. Le prix est décerné tous les trois ans.

La video comprenant le discours de description du prix et du lauréat est disponible à https://www.facebook.com/TheSocietyForEthnomusicology/videos/1601780733223099/ : 1:27:20-1:29:04. (L’extrait est directement visible à http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SEM_2017-General-Membership-Meeting-1601780733223099-12.mp4)

Traduction de l’extrait (texte de présentation du Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi 2017 par Katherine Butler Schofield):

C’est un énorme privilège, et particulièrement cette année, d’annoncer le lauréat du Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi 2017, qui est décerné pour reconnaître la contribution académique d’un chercheur ou d’une institution du monde islamique en musique. Le comité, constitué de Laudan Nooshin en tant que présidente […], et d’autres membres qui sont Jonathan Glasser et moi-même, nous réjouissons de décerner le Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi à Amine Beyhom […]. Amine Beyhom est un chercheur libanais impressionnant qui a entrepris un vaste projet comparatif qui relie entre elles des traditions musicales qui se situent au cœur du monde islamique. Il s’est impliqué profondément dans un très large panel, historique et géographique, de pratiques musicales et a développé un réseau étendu de collègues dans le monde arabe et en France. Il a clairement influencé durablement la musicologie et l’ethnomusicologie, et l’octroi de ce prix est aussi bien un honneur qu’une incitation pour lui à s’impliquer plus étroitement avec ses collègues de langue anglaise, plus particulièrement dans le domaine en expansion de l’ethnomusicologie historique. Et, autant que par la qualité de l’œuvre en soi, nous avons été impressionné.e.s par le nombre et l’éventail de lettres que nous avons reçues en soutien à sa nomination. Veuillez l’applaudir, in absentia.

Amine Beyhom remercie de tout cœur les personnes et les institutions qui l’ont nominé pour ce prix.

Richard Dumbrill invited by CERMAA/FOREDOFICO at CNSM

Richard Dumbrill is an English archaeomusicologist. He will speak about ancient Middle-Eastern musical systems at the Lebanese Conservatory in Sinn-el-Fil (Beirut-Lebanon), from 16:30 to 18:00 on Thursday the 23rd of April 2015, venue “S”. Dumbrill’s paper to be translated by Rosy Azar Beyhom during the event.

Richard Dumbrill will show that the earliest form of music theory sprouted in the Ancient Middle East some 4000 years ago, long before Pythagoras. Unlike with Greek music theory, where there is no contemporary textual evidence, (the earliest copies dating from the Western Dark Ages, around 1000 AD) Mesopotamian evidence rests with cuneiform clay tablets. The oldest dates from 2300 BC and the most recent from the first millennium BC. These texts are unequivocally about music theory and explain the formation of systems the nature of which being the source of the later maqam system. It is also very likely, that they used more than one musical system and this would be comparable to their metrology which also used a variety of systems.

Free admission; below: the text of the official invitation.

دعوة عامّة

“بداية التنظير الموسيقي في الشرق الأوسط القديم”

محاضرة للبروفيسور ريشارد دمبريل

في الثلاثاء 21 نيسان 2015 في القاعة “س” سن الفيل الساعة 4:30

 

يدعو المعهد الوطني العالي للموسيقى بالتعاون مع مركز الأبحاث حول الموسيقى العربية وقريباتها إلى محاضرة للبروفيسور ريشارد دمبريل حول أقدم ما وجده الإنسان حول التنظير الموسيقي في الشرق الأوسط القديم

يتناول المُحاضر حقبة تعود إلى 4.000 عام أي إلى ما قبل فيتاغورس، ترتكز على النقوش المسمارية من بلاد ما بين النهرين. تتميّز هذه النصوص المنقوشة بالتفسيرات حول الأنظمة الموسيقية وتكوينها وتطورّها (من المرجح) إلى ما يُعرف حاليًا بالمقام

يعود أقدم نقش مسماري إلى 2.300 ق.م. والأحدث إلى الألفية الأولى ق.م

أظهرت الدراسات حتى الآن أنّ الأقدمين كانوا يستعملون عدّة أنطمة موسيقية وذلك يتطابق مع تعدّد أنظمة القياس التي وُجدت في تلك الحقبة

 Figures from RD Beirut presentation 2015_Page_4 Figures from RD Beirut presentation 2015_Page_5 Figures from RD Beirut presentation 2015_Page_1 Figures from RD Beirut presentation 2015_Page_2 Figures from RD Beirut presentation 2015_Page_3

FOREDOFICO, CERMAA and ICONEA with the “Friends of the National Museum” foundation to produce a documentary film on the Making of Hurrian Song H.6.

Lyre-reconstructed-by-R.-Dumbrill
A lyre reconstructed by Richard Dumbrill for the Hurrian song H.6. project in Lebanon

In October 2012, ICONEA Director Richard Dumbrill visited Lebanon, initially to attend a conference in Beirut on Rituals in the Ancient Levant. The conference was cancelled following a bombing in the metropolis. Dumbrill seeked help from CERMAA/FOREDOFICO to produce a documentary film on the subject he had intended to give at the National Museum. The documentary, funded by the Friends of the National Museum and CERMAA/FOREDOFICO is about the research work Dumbrill has undertaken for the past 25 years on the translation of the oldest known musical text, written in the Hurrian language, dating from about 1400 years BC, and found at Ugarit in North East Syria in the 1950s. The documentary was shot by Paul Mattar, Founding member of FOREDOFICO, in a renowned archaeological site, and at the headquarters of CERMAA, in the suburbs of Beirut.

Rosy Azar Beyhom and Amine Beyhom, CERMAA founding members contributed to the Orientalisation of Dumbrill’s original rendition of the Hurrian material. The song was recorded at the CALA recording studios, a subdivision of FOREDOFICO specialised in archival recordings. Saad SAAB, President of FOREDOFICO made improvisastions on the Ꜥūd on the theme of the original music. The singing of the melody, and the acting on site was entrusted to a young and promising Lebanese singer, Lara Jokhadar Al-Aro. There, Lara played the role of a young woman afflicted with the curse of being childless, and sang her sorrow to the moon goddess NIKKAL so that she may bear child.

 

Lara Jokhadar al-Aro

 

 

The original score for the Hurrian H.6. song has been published in Richard Dumbrill’s article for NEMO N°1 :

  • Dumbrill, Richard : “Modus Vivendi,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 1 1 |2012-11| p. 89–116.

The first issue of NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 is now available / Sortie de NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1

English

NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 is available

CERMAA is delighted to inform you that the first issue, of Vol. 1 No. 1 (November 2012) is now available. It includes contributions of François Picard (France), Erik Marchand (France), Jacob Olley (Great Britain), Rosy Azar Beyhom (Lebanon), Markos Skoulios (Greece), Richard Dumbrill (Great Britain) et Amine Beyhom (Lebanon ; France).
The editorial and the summary page are available online. The hard copy (Price = 40 €) is distributed by Geuthner, France and downloadable from December 2013.

Français

Sortie de NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1

Le CERMAA a l’immense plaisir d’annoncer la sortie du Volume 1, Numéro 1 de NEMO (Novembre 2012) avec des contributions de François Picard (France), Erik Marchand (France), Jacob Olley (Grande-Bretagne), Rosy Azar Beyhom (Liban), Markos Skoulios (Grèce), Richard Dumbrill (Grande-Bretagne) et Amine Beyhom (Liban ; France).

L’Éditorial et le Sommaire sont accessibles en ligne. La version imprimée (Prix = 40 €) est distribuée par Geuthner ; la version numérique (payante) sera mise en ligne à partir de décembre 2013.

(shortlink=http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/?p=394)

 

 

CERMAA and ICONEA at USEK

Amine Beyhom of CERMAA and Richard Dumbrill of ICONEA presented papers on July 12-14 2012 Conference at the University of the Holy Spirit (USEK) at Kaslik Lebanon.

Amine Beyhom spoke about the need for accurate definition in specific terms.

Richard Dumbrill spoke of possible Near-Eastern origins of both maqam and Pythagorean systems in Bronze Age archeomusicology.

Research on Aesthetics in music with Jean During (CNRS – France)

CERMAA welcomed recently Jean During, a senior researcher at CNRS – France. Jean During led three interviews on June 03 2012 with renowned Lebanese music teachers and musicians Imane Homsy (qanun), Joseph Loueizeh (teacher of singing and numerous other activities – member of CERMAA and founding member of FOREDOFICO) and Saad Saab (`ud teacher and performer – President of FOREDOFICO and member of CERMAA). He was accompanied by Amine Beyhom for CERMAA.

The subject of the interviews was “Music Aesthetics”.

Jean During is also a member of the Academic Board of NEMO-Online, the Musicological Journal co-founded by CERMAA, ICONEA (British Museum and University of London) and PLM (Université de la Sorbonne – France).

Brest Conference on “Modality”

The Brest conference on modality took place from the 16th to the 18th of November. Please see http://www.drom-kba.eu/Conference-musicale-Musiques.html and http://www.drom-kba.eu/Colloque-du-Pole-de-la-modalite-et.html.

Amine Beyhom, Director of CERMAA, presented a conference with Erik Marchand on the 16th of November, and a paper on un-tempered instruments the next day.

Ꜥūd Bibliography

We are proud to announce that we have started to implement the bibliography of Arabian and Mediteranean musics on Cermaa’s website.

 

The first bibliography published to day is the Ꜥūd Bibliography, to be found under “Bibliography > Ꜥūd Bibliography“. It comprises a reasoned choice of references on the Ꜥūd, to be further enriched with time.

 

Research on the scales of Byzantine Chant

The scales of Byzantine Chant are very close, in performance and in Lebanon, to those used by the Arabian “classical” music (taught in “Conservatoires” in Lebanon).

Mīkhā’īl Mashāqa, a syrian-lebanese medecine doctor and music theorist of the 19th century, claimed that the 68 division of the octave of Chrysanthos the Reformer (whom he did not name specifically) was superior to the 24-quartertone grid of the Arabs, which he is the first to ascribe in detail.

How are Byzantine and Arabian scales and modes related, and what lies behind the two Byzantine divisions of the octave established by the Byzantine Church in the 19th century ? Are the 24-quartertone and the 68-minutes divisions of the octave related, and how ? Is there a difference between the scales used by the Byzantine Church in Greece and the scales used in Lebanon and Syria (Patriarcate of Antioch) ?

These and many other should be soon answered in a book planned to be published in 2013 by Geuthner, the French publisher who published Erlanger’s La musique arabe from 1930 to 1959.

 

We will publish posts concerning the different encounters with Byzantine Chanters and specialists on the site.