NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6&7 available / Mise en ligne de NEMO-Online Vol. 4 n°6&7

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6&7 is now available for downloading (download link below) / NEMO-Online Vol. 4 nos 6&7 est disponible pour téléchargement (lien ci-dessous).

All pdf articles in this volume are available individually at http://nemo-online.org/articles and bookmarked for titles, subtitles and figures / tous les articles au format pdf de ce volume sont téléchargeables individuellement à http://nemo-online.org/articles et contiennent des marque-pages correspondant aux titres, sous-titres et figures.

Note that minor changes in the layout may occur between individual articles and the binded volume, due to the harmonising of the layouts between No. 6 and No. 7 / Les changements mineurs de la mise en page entre articles individuels et volume collaté sont dûs à l’harmonisation entre les deux numéros 6 & 7 suite aux améliorations apportées à partir du n°7.

Hard and soft copy printed versions to follow shortly / Les versions imprimées seront disponibles prochainement.

 

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 contents / contenu / ملخّص :

Editor’s letter / Éditorial / كلمة الناشرين : Evolution, problems and alternate propositions for musicology and ethnomusicology / Évolution, problèmes et proposition alternatives pour musicologie et de l’ethnomusicologie التطوّر، المشاكل والحلول البديلة لعلم الموسيقى (موسيقولوجيا) وعلم الموسيقى
الإثنية (الإتنوموسيقولوجيا)

NEMO-Online No. 6 :

  • Amine Beyhom : “A Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 6 |2017-05| p. 5–88.
  • Richard Dumbrill : “The Truth about Babylonian Music,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 6 |2017-08| p. 91–121.
  • Bruno Deschênes : “A preliminary approach to the analysis of honkyoku, the solo repertoire of the Japanese shakuhachi,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 6 |2017-08| p. 123–143.

 

 NEMO-Online No. 7 :

  • Amine Beyhom“MAT for the VIAMAP – Maqām Analysis Tools for the Video-Animated Music Analysis Project,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 7 |2018-11| p. 145–256.

Vol. 4 Nos. 6&7 (pdf).

Previous volumes / Volumes précédents / الأعداد السابقة /

Note: we use at NEMO-Online the CharisSIL font / nous utilisons à NEMO-Online la police CharisSIL / http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/CharisSIL-4.110.zip / also available at / également téléchargeable à / http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/download_win.html.

(Permalink: http://nemo-online.org/?p=1750)

Volos conference on Psaltiki 2018

Rosy & Amine Beyhom participated in the 3rd International Musicological and Psaltic Conference on Psaltic Art of the Department of Psaltic Art and Musicology of the Volos Academy for Theological Studies.

The Conference took place in the Conference Center of the Holy Metropolis of Demetrias, in Melissiatika, Volos, Greece, between May 30th (official opening in the evening) and June 2nd (official closing in the afternoon), 2018.

Amine Beyhom presented a paper entitled “Theory and Practice of Psaltiki: Why do they not coincide?“, and assisted Rosy Beyhom for the recording of four Greek cantors who performed Kyrie Ekekraxa (by Petros Byzantios) and Axion estin (Anonymous).

Volos Cantors_lightAbove: Five Greek cantors – Volos (Makrinitsa) 2018/05/31 © Rosy Beyhom. Front row, left to right: Ioannis Tomas, Nikolaos Siklafidis and Michalis Stroumpakis; 2nd row: Conference host Konstantin Karagounis and Emmanouil Giannopoulos.

The video-animated analyses of these chants will soon be published on our site as a further contribution to the development of alternative methods for the analysis of melodic music of the Mediterranean and around (maqām music).

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by Joseph Yazbeck in 2011

Two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2012 by Joseph Yazbeck. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by Joseph Yazbeck (below)

  • Arabic Version by Joseph Yazbeck (below)

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by fr. Nicolas Malek in 2011

Release by CERMAA of two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2011 by fr. Nicolas Malek. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by fr. Nicolas Malek (below)

  • Arabic Version by fr. Nicolas Malek (below)

New page by CERMAA dedicated to Video Analyses of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios

A new page, dedicated to different versions of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios has been added to the site of the CERMAA.
Kyrie Ekekraxa is a well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul). The chant is in the 8th mode (on Νη=c)  of the Byzantine Church (equivalent to maqām Rāst in Arabian music), with an incursion (a modulation) in the 2nd mode (“Mild chromatic”).

Most of the audio recordings analyzed in the videos on this page were originally published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584), with Power Point animations for four Lebanese cantors, together with Greek versions of this chant (8 versions in all, with detailed analyses of two excerpts each undertaken in the aforementioned book). Two other recordings were undertaken with a fifth Lebanese cantor: it was too late however to analyze them as the book was already under print. The two additional recordings were also published as audio recordings in the accompanying CD-Rom of the book.

All these should be (re)analysed and published on this dedicated page.

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by an Anonymous Cantor in 2011

Release by CERMAA of two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2011 by an Anonymous Cantor. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by Anonymous (below)


 

  • Arabic Version by Anonymous (below)

Release of CERMAA Video of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed in Greek by fr. Makarios Haidamous in 2012

This the Greek version (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2012 by fr. Makarios Haidamous. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.

Compare with the version in Arabic by the same cantor at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/933.

 

Release of CERMAA Video of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed by fr Makarios Haidamous 2012

The CERMAA is delighted to publish this video animation (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, a well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul). This animation relates to a performance in 2012 by fr. Makarios Haidamous, with the text in Arabic language. The audio was published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584), with Power Point animations for four Lebanese cantors (including fr. Makarios Haidamous), together with Greek versions of this chant (8 versions in all). Two other recordings were undertaken with a fifth Lebanese cantor: it was however too late to analyze them as the book was already under print. The two additional recordings were published as audio recordings in the accompanying CD-Rom of the book.
This is the second video animation based on Pitch analysis with the Praat program that the CERMAA publishes on the internet. The first video was the Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar (http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/926). A series of video animations of different versions of Kyrie Ekekraxa should be made available during the year 2018. The aim of this series is to demonstrate the variety of interpretations of one chant by different cantors.
As with Lara’s animation for H6, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.

Call for Papers for NEMO-Online issue No. 7 (November 2018) and Free download of NEMO-Online 6 articles / Appel à Contributions pour NEMO-Online n°7 et Mise en téléchargement des articles de NEMO-Online n°6

English

Free download of the articles of Nemo-Online Vol. 4 No. 6 below (click for the pdf version on the corresponding title of each article). 

Issue 6 of NEMO-Online and editorial will be available in hard copy and pdf with Issue 7 in Volume 4, November 2018.

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6 & 7 call for papers was: Research groups CERMAA, ICONEA and IReMus are seeking papers for the sixth and seventh issues of NEMO. The theme, continued from the theme of NEMO-Online No. 5 (available here), is about ‘Musicology/Ethnomusicology: evolutions, problems, alternatives’.

This call for papers is sustained for NEMO-Online Vol. 4 No. 7 issue. We would like this issue of NEMO to continue the debate initiated in NEMO-Online No. 5&6 concerning the usefulness of the science, the problems raised due to powerful and contradictory non-scientific characteristics, and the alternatives which may be proposed.

Papers to be sent both to Richard Dumbrill and Amine Beyhom and should follow the editorial layout.

Following the updated editorial policy of NEMO-Online, papers are published as soon as ready during the year preceding the official publication in November of each year, then emendated if necessary for final publication. Papers hold the date of their effective publication besides the date of their official publication (between parentheses). To comply with NEMO-Online publishing policy, and as with all articles of the review since Volume 3, the pdf version includes bookmarks corresponding to the titles, sub-titles, tables and figures, which should help the reader navigate between the different parts of the article.

The Editing Board will consider the publication of papers which might be ‘off subject’ as long as they retain some relationship with the wider theme of the publication.

Deadlines for NEMO-Online No. 7 issue: proposals by end of May 2018 and finalized paper by end of July 2018.

Previous volumes available here, individual articles on the dedicated page (Articles tab) on NEMO-Online website.

 

NEMO-Online 6 contents :

Musicology/Ethnomusicology: evolutions, problems, alternatives (2)

Originally entitled  “A New Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales and their Origins” and published (2010) in the proceedings of ICONEA 2008, this paper has been emendated, updated and enriched, and is reissued for NEMO-Online Vol. 4 No. 6. New research since its first publication presented complementary and sometimes clarifying facts which, with the evolution of terminology (see Beyhom’s “Lexicon” in NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2 – in French, with Appendix L – entitled “Core Glossary” – in this article complementing it), makes it indispensable to publish this new edition. Most of the tables and figures have been reintegrated in the body text, and a dedicated appendix (Appendix G) has been added concerning Octavial scales with limited transposition.

(Adapted) excerpts from the article (Introduction):

The insistence of Mainstream Western Archaeomusicology at force-fitting the Babylonian musical system into the Western model is one of the greatest oversights in the History of music. It came from the methodology (or rather of its absence) of certain Assyriologists and of their determination at spearheading “their discoveries” by means of unsuitable Western models. The manner in which Musical systems are constructed, whether consciously or not, are part of the culture of a people and must be unveiled with the utmost respect and without linkage to theories of later cultures as this would lead to colonialist unification. This article is the consequence of my determined endeavor at academically fostering the proof of the evidence against unproven presumptive inference, and more significantly to assert, scientifically, that heptatonism – which is not universal – is by no means engraved onto mankind’s unconscious. It is a structure, among others, which eventually hatched in the Near-East, as part and consequence of another or other systems, but not as a new, independent and exclusive concept.

Bruno Chikushin (his artist name) Deschênes, a musician and author of a book on the shakuhashi, is a trained shakuhachi player. The aim of his article is to propose a musician’s point of view on the analysis of the honkyoku repertoire. In order to propose another model for understanding this unique music, Deschênes expands on previous authors’ proposals and shows, in the final section, that some of these authors’ conclusions do apply to honkyoku music, while others do not. Although these authors present a relevant understanding of the melodic structure of honkyoku, Deschênes suggests that there is more to it than they propose, specifically highlighting two important aspects of this music that they miss, namely that playing shakuhachi has to do first and foremost with tone-color, not pitches, and that the melodic quality of each phrase and each piece is more in the melodic forms and contours created by the kakuontei and the kakuon than it is in the pitches (see the Glossary at the end of the article).

 

Français

Les articles du numéro 6 de NEMO-Online sont accessibles librement en téléchargement ci-dessous (cliquer sur les titres des articles pour télécharger les pdf).

Le numéro 6 et l’éditorial seront publiés, en version papier et pdf, conjointement avec le Numéro 7 au sein du Volume 4 en (novembre) 2018.

L’appel à contributions pour NEMO-Online Volume 4 nos 6 & 7 était:

Les centres et groupes de recherches CERMAA, ICONEA et IReMus ont le plaisir d’annoncer le thème du Volume 4 de NEMO-Online, nos 6 & 7 : « Musicologies/Ethnomusicologies : évolutions, problèmes, alternatives ». Le thème est la continuation du thème de NEMO-Online no 5, que vous pouvez revoir ici.

Cet appel est maintenu pour NEMO-Online n°7. Nous souhaitons à NEMO que ce numéro prolonge le débat sur l’utilité de la discipline, sur les problèmes suscités par ses caractéristiques fortement (et contradictoirement) a-scientifiques, et, surtout, sur les alternatives qui peuvent être proposées.

Les articles de ce numéro seront publiés au fur et à mesure de leur réception-évaluation-préparation pour la publication internet. NEMO-Online No 7 rassemblera les articles parus et en cours de parution et sera publié en novembre 2018, comme partie du Volume 4 (NEMO-Online Nos 6 & 7).

Langues et normes : voir ici.
Envoi des propositions d’articles à Richard Dumbrill et à Amine Beyhom avant : fin mai 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

Date limite d’envoi des articles : fin juillet 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

La rédaction acceptera également d’examiner des dossiers spéciaux ou des articles hors-thème, du moment qu’ils concernent la thématique générale de la revue.

Les volumes précédents sont disponibles ici, les articles individuels dans l’onglet Articles récemment ajouté sur le site de NEMO-Online.

Contenu du numéro 6 :

Musicologie/Ethnomusicologie: evolutions, problèmes, alternatives (2)

Le titre original de cet article, publié en 2010 après le colloque ICONEA 2008, était “A New Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales and their Origins”. Cette version publiée par NEMO-Online porte le titre, plus concis, “A Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales”, l’hypothèse présentée n’étant pas nouvelle (établie en 2003) et toujours non remise en cause dans la littérature musicologique. L’article est corrigé, mis à jour pour la terminologie (voir le “Lexique” de l’auteur dans NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2, avec l’Appendice L – le “Core Glossary” – dans cet article comme complément), et augmenté.  La plupart des tables et figures a été réintégrée dans le texte principal, et l’Appendice G (concernant les échelles à transposition limitée) ajouté, avec son complément Power Point. 

Extraits (adaptés) de l’article (Introduction):

L’acharnement avec lequel la musicologie occidentale a essayé de refondre le système babylonien dans un moule occidental, ne lui convenant pas, est certainement l’expression d’un occicentrisme persistant issu d’une méthodologie, ou plutôt de son absence, parmi les assyriologues et pseudos-musicologues, et de leur acharnement à promouvoir leurs ‘découvertes’ par le moyen de modèles occidentaux inappropriés. La manière dont les systèmes musicaux sont construits, consciemment ou non, fait partie de la culture d’un groupe ‘ethnique’ et doit être dévoilée avec le plus grand respect et sans, à tout prix, les rattacher à des cultures qui leurs sont postérieures car cela équivaudrait à une unification colonialiste. Cet article est la conséquence de ma détermination à produire la preuve des faits contre les présomptions issues d’interprétations, et plus particulièrement de démontrer que l’heptatonisme – qui n’est pas universel – n’est certainement pas gravé dans notre inconscient. C’est une structure, entre d’autres, qui éventuellement eût éclos au Proche-Orient comme partie et comme la conséquence d’un autre ou d’autres systèmes, mais non un système nouveau, indépendant et exclusif.

Bruno Chikushin (de son nom d’artiste japonais) Deschênes, auteur du premier livre en français consacré au shakuhachi, est un musicien de formation. Le but de son article est de proposer une analyse du répertoire solo de honkyoku pour shakuhachi du point de vue du musicien. Afin de proposer un modèle qui devrait permetre de mieux comprendre cette musique unique, Deschênes développe les propositions d’auteurs précédents et montre, dans la dernière section, que certaines conclusions de ces auteurs s’appliquent à la musique honkyoku, alors que d’autres ne s’appliquent pas. Bien que ces auteurs présentent une compréhension pertinente de la structure mélodique de honkyoku, Deschênes suggère qu’il y a plus que ce que leurs analayses proposent, soulignant spécifiquement deux aspects importants de cette musique qui sont absents, à savoir que le jeu du shakuhachi consiste d’abord à mettre de l’avant les timbres musicaux et non les hauteurs, et que la qualité mélodique de chaque phrase et de chaque pièce est plus dans les formes mélodiques et les contours créés par les kakuontei (intervalle nucélaire) et les kakuon (note nucléaire) que dans les hauteurs proprement dites (voir aussi le glossaire à la fin de l’article).

 

(Permalink: http://nemo-online.org/archives/1692)

CERMAA Director Amine Beyhom awarded the 2017 Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi Prize / Le prix 2017 Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi décerné au Directeur du CERMAA Amine Beyhom

English

We are delighted at CERMAA to announce that Amine Beyhom, director of the CERMAA, was awarded on the 28th of October 2017, by the Society for Ethnomusicology, the Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi Prize for the year 2017. The prize is awarded every three years.

The video of the presentation speech is available at https://www.facebook.com/TheSocietyForEthnomusicology/videos/1601780733223099/ : 1:27:20-1:29:04. (The excerpt can be directly watched at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SEM_2017-General-Membership-Meeting-1601780733223099-12.mp4)

Transcribed excerpt from Katherine Butler Schofield’s presentation speech:

It’s an enormous privilege in this year, of all years, to announce the winner of the 2017 Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi prize, which is bestowed to recognize the scholarly contributions of an individual music scholar or music institution in the Islamic world. The committee, constituted by Laudan Nooshin as chair […] and other members, which are Jonathan Glasser and myself, we are delighted to award the Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi prize this year to Amine Beyhom […]. Amine Beyhom is an impressive Lebanese scholar who has taken on a broad comparison project that links musical traditions that are at the historical heart of the Islamic world. He has engaged seriously with a huge geographical and historical range of musical practices, and has built up a broad network of colleagues in the Arabic speaking world and in France. He has clearly had a long-term influence on musicology and ethnomusicology, and giving him this award is both an honor for him, and an opportunity for him to engage more closely with English-speaking colleagues, particularly in the growing field of historical ethnomusicology. And as well as the work in itself, we were impressed by the number and range of letters that we received in support of his nomination. Please, give him a round of applause, in absentia [applause].

Amine Beyhom would like to express his heartfelt thanks to all the persons and institutions who nominated him for this prize.

 

Français

Le CERMAA a le plaisir d’annoncer qu’Amine Beyhom, directeur du CERMAA, a reçu le 28 Octobre 2017, de la Society for Ethnomusicology, le Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi pour l’année 2017. Le prix est décerné tous les trois ans.

La video comprenant le discours de description du prix et du lauréat est disponible à https://www.facebook.com/TheSocietyForEthnomusicology/videos/1601780733223099/ : 1:27:20-1:29:04. (L’extrait est directement visible à http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/SEM_2017-General-Membership-Meeting-1601780733223099-12.mp4)

Traduction de l’extrait (texte de présentation du Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi 2017 par Katherine Butler Schofield):

C’est un énorme privilège, et particulièrement cette année, d’annoncer le lauréat du Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi 2017, qui est décerné pour reconnaître la contribution académique d’un chercheur ou d’une institution du monde islamique en musique. Le comité, constitué de Laudan Nooshin en tant que présidente […], et d’autres membres qui sont Jonathan Glasser et moi-même, nous réjouissons de décerner le Prix Lois Ibsen Al-Faruqi à Amine Beyhom […]. Amine Beyhom est un chercheur libanais impressionnant qui a entrepris un vaste projet comparatif qui relie entre elles des traditions musicales qui se situent au cœur du monde islamique. Il s’est impliqué profondément dans un très large panel, historique et géographique, de pratiques musicales et a développé un réseau étendu de collègues dans le monde arabe et en France. Il a clairement influencé durablement la musicologie et l’ethnomusicologie, et l’octroi de ce prix est aussi bien un honneur qu’une incitation pour lui à s’impliquer plus étroitement avec ses collègues de langue anglaise, plus particulièrement dans le domaine en expansion de l’ethnomusicologie historique. Et, autant que par la qualité de l’œuvre en soi, nous avons été impressionné.e.s par le nombre et l’éventail de lettres que nous avons reçues en soutien à sa nomination. Veuillez l’applaudir, in absentia.

Amine Beyhom remercie de tout cœur les personnes et les institutions qui l’ont nominé pour ce prix.