Release of Eight Video-Analyses of Byzantine Scales performed by Four Lebanese Cantors

These Eight Video-analyses of the scales of Byzantine chant (for the scales of the Eight modes) are proposed on a dedicated main page. The analyses come originally from the book of Amine Beyhom Théories et pratiques de l’échelle dans le chant byzantin arabe : Une approche comparative et analytique proposant une solution inédite pour le système théorique de Chrysanthos le Madyte and were edited for video.

Four Lebanese cantors of Byzantine chant – Fr. Nicolas Malek, Fr. Makarios Haidamous, Joseph Yazbeck and a cantor who preferred to remain anonymous – accepted to record (among other performances) the scales of the eight canonical modes of their liturgical chant for research purposes. Each of them is a renowned soloist and choir director in Lebanon.

Opening Screen of the video for the First Byzantine Mode

The complete results of the analyses of these recordings are proposed in the aforementioned book, while particular results concerning the first mode were presented on various occasions in Greece and in Cyprus, but also in France, Tunisia and in Lebanon.

The analyses in the videos are based on these presentations, which in turn were based on power point animations proposed in the aforementioned book.

Each video comprises a short theoretical introduction contextualizing the scales of the current mode within the general frame of the 19th-Century Second Reform of Byzantine chant.

Example of a slide with explanations on the scale of the First Byzantine Mode according to the teaching of Thrasyvoulos Stanitsas

Moreover, the first video (for the First mode) features a General Introduction which explains shortly:

  • The solmization of the Byzantine – and equivalences between Byzantine and Western – degrees of the scale
Byzantine chant solmization with transliteration and equivalences with the degrees of the Western Common-Practice scale
  • The accidentals used in the theory of the Second Reform (and in the Western/Byzantine notation proposed by the author)
Accidentals used in the theory of Byzantine Chant (19th-Century Second Reform) with equivalents in fractions of the tone (including cents)
  • The scores and literal notations
Western/Byzantine and literal notations of scales
  • (And) Explanations about the graphic representation of the results
Conventions used for the Graphic notations of scales

The videos on the main page are in High resolution, and also available on the YouTube Channell of CERMAA. An alternate, Low resolution version is proposed for each mode (and the Intro) in a dedicated page.

Volos conference on Psaltiki 2018

Rosy & Amine Beyhom participated in the 3rd International Musicological and Psaltic Conference on Psaltic Art of the Department of Psaltic Art and Musicology of the Volos Academy for Theological Studies.

The Conference took place in the Conference Center of the Holy Metropolis of Demetrias, in Melissiatika, Volos, Greece, between May 30th (official opening in the evening) and June 2nd (official closing in the afternoon), 2018.

Amine Beyhom presented a paper entitled “Theory and Practice of Psaltiki: Why do they not coincide?“, and assisted Rosy Beyhom for the recording of four Greek cantors who performed Kyrie Ekekraxa (by Petros Byzantios) and Axion estin (Anonymous).

Volos Cantors_lightAbove: Five Greek cantors – Volos (Makrinitsa) 2018/05/31 © Rosy Beyhom. Front row, left to right: Ioannis Tomas, Nikolaos Siklafidis and Michalis Stroumpakis; 2nd row: Conference host Konstantin Karagounis and Emmanouil Giannopoulos.

The video-animated analyses of these chants will soon be published on our site as a further contribution to the development of alternative methods for the analysis of melodic music of the Mediterranean and around (maqām music).

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by Joseph Yazbeck in 2011

Two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2012 by Joseph Yazbeck. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by Joseph Yazbeck (below)

  • Arabic Version by Joseph Yazbeck (below)

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by fr. Nicolas Malek in 2011

Release by CERMAA of two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2011 by fr. Nicolas Malek. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by fr. Nicolas Malek (below)

  • Arabic Version by fr. Nicolas Malek (below)

New page by CERMAA dedicated to Video Analyses of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios

A new page, dedicated to different versions of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios has been added to the site of the CERMAA.
Kyrie Ekekraxa is a well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul). The chant is in the 8th mode (on Νη=c)  of the Byzantine Church (equivalent to maqām Rāst in Arabian music), with an incursion (a modulation) in the 2nd mode (“Mild chromatic”).

Most of the audio recordings analyzed in the videos on this page were originally published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584), with Power Point animations for four Lebanese cantors, together with Greek versions of this chant (8 versions in all, with detailed analyses of two excerpts each undertaken in the aforementioned book). Two other recordings were undertaken with a fifth Lebanese cantor: it was too late however to analyze them as the book was already under print. The two additional recordings were also published as audio recordings in the accompanying CD-Rom of the book.

All these should be (re)analysed and published on this dedicated page.

Release of CERMAA Videos of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed, in Greek and Arabic, by an Anonymous Cantor in 2011

Release by CERMAA of two additional Greek and Arabic versions (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2011 by an Anonymous Cantor. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.
Compare with other analyses of the same chant by different performers at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/analyses/byzantine-chant/kyrie-ekekraxa-by-petros-byzantios.

  • Greek Version by Anonymous (below)


 

  • Arabic Version by Anonymous (below)

Release of CERMAA Video of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed in Greek by fr. Makarios Haidamous in 2012

This the Greek version (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, the well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul) performed in 2012 by fr. Makarios Haidamous. The audio recording was first published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584).
As with other CERMAA animated analyses, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis (with two dashed lines for the tonic and octave pitches) while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.

Compare with the version in Arabic by the same cantor at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/933.

 

Release of CERMAA Video of Kyrie Ekekraxa by Petros Byzantios performed by fr Makarios Haidamous 2012

The CERMAA is delighted to publish this video animation (below) of the chant Kyrie Ekekraxa, a well known composition by Petros Byzantios in the 19th-century Constantinople (now Istanbul). This animation relates to a performance in 2012 by fr. Makarios Haidamous, with the text in Arabic language. The audio was published in Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant in 2015 (see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584), with Power Point animations for four Lebanese cantors (including fr. Makarios Haidamous), together with Greek versions of this chant (8 versions in all). Two other recordings were undertaken with a fifth Lebanese cantor: it was however too late to analyze them as the book was already under print. The two additional recordings were published as audio recordings in the accompanying CD-Rom of the book.
This is the second video animation based on Pitch analysis with the Praat program that the CERMAA publishes on the internet. The first video was the Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar (http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/926). A series of video animations of different versions of Kyrie Ekekraxa should be made available during the year 2018. The aim of this series is to demonstrate the variety of interpretations of one chant by different cantors.
As with Lara’s animation for H6, the upper part offers a general view of the analysis while the lower part shows the detailed analysis which includes, in this case, an overprint of the Byzantine scale of the 1881 (Second) Reform of Byzantine chant.

The first issue of NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 is now available / Sortie de NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1

English

NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 is available

CERMAA is delighted to inform you that the first issue, of Vol. 1 No. 1 (November 2012) is now available. It includes contributions of François Picard (France), Erik Marchand (France), Jacob Olley (Great Britain), Rosy Azar Beyhom (Lebanon), Markos Skoulios (Greece), Richard Dumbrill (Great Britain) et Amine Beyhom (Lebanon ; France).
The editorial and the summary page are available online. The hard copy (Price = 40 €) is distributed by Geuthner, France and downloadable from December 2013.

Français

Sortie de NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1

Le CERMAA a l’immense plaisir d’annoncer la sortie du Volume 1, Numéro 1 de NEMO (Novembre 2012) avec des contributions de François Picard (France), Erik Marchand (France), Jacob Olley (Grande-Bretagne), Rosy Azar Beyhom (Liban), Markos Skoulios (Grèce), Richard Dumbrill (Grande-Bretagne) et Amine Beyhom (Liban ; France).

L’Éditorial et le Sommaire sont accessibles en ligne. La version imprimée (Prix = 40 €) est distribuée par Geuthner ; la version numérique (payante) sera mise en ligne à partir de décembre 2013.

(shortlink=http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/?p=394)

 

 

CERMAA and ICONEA at USEK

Amine Beyhom of CERMAA and Richard Dumbrill of ICONEA presented papers on July 12-14 2012 Conference at the University of the Holy Spirit (USEK) at Kaslik Lebanon.

Amine Beyhom spoke about the need for accurate definition in specific terms.

Richard Dumbrill spoke of possible Near-Eastern origins of both maqam and Pythagorean systems in Bronze Age archeomusicology.