Imagine: A Scientific Fantasy – or Video-Analysis from 2D to 3D on the example of a Huseynî Taksim performed by Neyzen Tevfik

This 46th video-analysis of the VIAMAP series (but the 47th to be made public – see http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/1433) features 3D graphic techniques as well as a short introduction explaining the scale used in the analysis. It is a demonstration of some of the possibilities offered by 3D handling of graphic analysis of melodies, on the example of a Huseynî Taksim performed by Neyzen Tevfik Kolayli, corresponding to track 11 on the CD 199 Kalan Müzik entitled Hiç’in Azâb-ı Mukaddes’i – Neyzen Tevfik (2000-2001). Note that a preliminary version was published privately February 8, 2019 on the YouTube channel of the CERMAA.

Neyzen Tevfik performing on ney: from CD 199 Kalan Müzik p. 55


The last sequence preceding the end credits proposes the following text:

now imagine what it would be if we could…
apply 3D graphic analysis and animation
to all aspects and characteristics of sound
stop, rewind, slow down the music and animation at will
zoom in, zoom out, keep selected characteristics
and look up each and all details from the desired point of view and, finally, apply all these to the analysis of multi-part music with each part shown separately, or together with other parts…

Amine Beyhom – “Imagine, a scientific fantasy”

A CERMAA production

Analysis, graphic design and editing: Amine Beyhom


Notes for the graphic representation

The pitch contour is shown as a black broken line in the 2D analysis, and in blueish color in the 3D analysis, with the relative intensity shown as a reddish (maroonish) line. In the 3D analysis, the pitch and intensity contours are showed in two parallel planes with a corresponding cursor for each of them. The graphic scale (see figure below) is based on on the conventional quarter-tone division (half-flat and half-sharp accidentals) and features to the left (and in the intermediate column) the names of the degrees of the scale: these follow Amine Beyhom’s proposed solmization (available as FHT 57 p. 245 in the article “MAT for the VIAMAP” by the author/editor – downloadable here, and below), namely, for the main degrees of the scale of maqām Rāst: rā = RĀST = c, = DŪKĀ = d, = SĪKĀ = e, ja = JAHĀRKĀ = f, na = NAWĀ = g, ḥu = ḤUSAYNĪ = a, aw = AWJ = b and Rā = KIRDĀN = c’ (C). The tonic (here ) is relative with note names undergoing a change of the case of the initial letter with the change of octaves. Intermediate notes (ʿarabāt) are likewise given corresponding solmization syllables.

Explanations about the graphic scale used in the video
Copy of FHT 57 p. 245 in the article “MAT for the VIAMAP” by the author/editor: Extended solmization of the scale of maqām music. Columns from left to right: (1) Original (7 notes per octave) solmization proposed in 2012; (2) Names of the main notes of the scale (the burdāt of maqām RĀST); (3) Names of the intermediate notes between the burdāt (ʿarabāt); (4) Names of the intermediate notes between the ʿarabāt (tīk = raised, nīm = lowered); (5) number of the note in the scale of al-Ḥijāzī; (6) Extended solmization as proposed by the author; (7) Corresponding numbers of the notes in the “Modern” scale (Western-inspired on the base of the division of the half-tone in two equal parts). Note that RĀST equates with c while however not indicating a fixed (but a relative) pitch. Degrees tīk-KURDĪ, nīm-BŪSALĪK, tīk-ʿAJAM and nīm-NAHAFT figure on a gray background to underline the fact that the “Modern” theory of the scale does not acknowledge them: consequently, the intervals between adjacent notes in column (7) – the last to the right – differ one from another by one quarter-tone (theoretical). Lastly: the solmization of note NAHAFT was modified as to avoid creating a duplicate with the (main) note NAWĀ: KAWASHT is the equivalent of NAHAFT in the lower octave (below the RĀST). See also the tables in ‎FHT ‎‎54 of the aforementioned article for a complete review of the degrees of the two-octavial scale of maqām music
Excerpt from the liner notes: [p. 51, 53]

Neyzen Tevfik Kolayli was one of the most interesting and unusual personalities of Turkish Music, and is remembered as one of its “legendary heroes”. He was born in Bodrum on March 28, 1879, and died on January 28, 1953 in Istanbul, at the age of 74. His life was a series of adventures that might seem startling or at least incongruous to the common person. He might be found playing his ney one day in the Grand Vizier’s mansions with the repose of a king, and the next day on the street, a handkerchief spread out in front of him, playing for drinking money. […]

He was smitten at the early age of 7 by the voice of the ney, and was so bound by his passion for this voice that it was the most basic element of his existence. From surviving recordings, as well as awe-filled testimonies of those writers who heard him play, we can gain some idea of how that passionate bond moved him.

Mehmet Ergün – Translated by Bob Beer

Video Analysis

Literal description of the performance

Note in the analysis below that s_a = “Analysis time in seconds”; s_v = “Video time in seconds” ; “tpps” = “Theoretical Position of the Pitch on the Scale”; furthermore, the upper and lower cases lettering differentiates (the scale of) for example maqām Rāst (initial uppercase) from the (pitch) tonic RĀST (uppercase) and the polychord (or genos) rāst (lowercase). Further explanations can be found at http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/1238 and http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/1273.

Note also that, due to two factors which are the accompanying cello and the bad condition of the recording, all details of the analysis could not be reproduced and that the reproduction of the tonic of the scale performed by the neyist may – among other characteristics – be slightly influenced by the (lower) tonic performed with the cello (see figure below in which the tonic is too low around 70 s_a).

Frame showing the reproduction of the tonic of the maqām as performed by the ney (beg. 70 s_a), here influenced by the lower tonic of the cello

General analysis

On the general ascending scale of maqām Ḥusaynī dū (d) 3344334 (in multiples of the quarter-tone – concatenated) the performer begins with a jump of fourth from (d) to na (g) then to the fifth ḥu (a) and ascends to the upper Ja (F) then exposes the descending scale till lower  (C) (thus defining the span of the performance, i.e. one octave + fifth, with exceptional rises to the upper Na – G – at 130 and 137 s_a) while returning to the central ḥu (a) and stabilizing around it with various developments until the return (at 51 s_a) to the tonic. Follows a display of the different subdivisions of the maqām scale and a display of virtuoso techniques, including an extended (in time) portamento from (below) the upper Ja (F) to the upper (d) [111-119 s_a] followed by developments on rā (c) (c. 130 s_a – probably a jins rāst 433[4] leading to the upper Na – G), while returning to the main development of the scale from 152 to 162 s_a (with modulations) followed by the conclusion of the performance (164-188 s_a) on the tonic (d).

Parts I and II are balanced (about 80 seconds each) with a shorter (25 seconds) conclusive part.

A (more) Detailed analysis:

Part I from 0 to 79 s_a (77 to 156 s_v): The initial sub-part (I.I) of Part I of the performance consists in a development of the scale of maqām Ḥusaynī with an initial jump of fourth from (d) to na (g) then a call from fourth to the fifth ḥu (a – 1-2 s_a) followed by a modified bayāt genos [ḥu – a – 334 + 33] resulting in a low in portamento to the “tpps” (“Theoretical Position of the Pitch on the Scale”) around 7 s_a (see also at 9 s_a), then a descending development of the scale from the octave tonic (D) suggesting a būsalīk aspect of the descending na to (g to d) part [424 on dū=d] – because of the low na (g), ja (f) and (dū=d is frequently, if not systematically, lower than the tpps which confirms the handling of the maqām as a plagal maqām Bayāt centered on ḥu=a). Rise beg. 11 s_a at DŪKĀ (t-zi=d) in būsalīk [424] with always low ja (t-bū=f) and na (t-ḥij=g) – note also the low (g) at 15 s_a. Then comes a descending development of the upper genos bayāt (beg. 16 s_a) with beautiful descending portamentos from aw+ (b) to ḥu (a) around 18 and 20 s_a, with a concluding first part (21-30 s_a) with a confirmation of the lower būsalīk on t-zi (=d) closing on ḥu (26-28 s_a). Note: (e) and ḥu (a) are here pivotal notes which remain stable throughout this first part.

The second sub-part (I.II) starts with a similar initial call from fourth to fifth while it however hints a lower na (“n-na”=t-ḥij=g at 29.5 s_a) with a similar also hint of low (“n-rā”=t-ka=c) rising to (c) at around 35 s_a – repeated around 37 s_a – during the development of the upper bayāt (ḥu=a 334). In the descending development of this genos undertaken by the performer beg. 37 s_a, a ʿaj=bb (“n-aw” is first hinted, then confirmed at 41 s_a in what becomes a descending nahawand (or būsalik) genos on na [na=g 424] extended below to the ja=f [ja 4424] which transforms it in a ʿajam tetrachord on ja=f (43-44 s_a) and back (45-49 s_a) to bayāt [334] on =d and a confirmation of ḥu=a as pivotal degree of the scale, and closing (around 51 s_a) on t-bū (f). In both upper and lower part of the scale, for these two initial sub-parts (from 0 to 50 s_a), subtle changes in pitches and the use of portamentos create constant variations between the use of lower (than ḥu=a) bayāt [=d 334] and būsalīk [=d – or t-zi 424] tetrachords with a definite tendency to shift from “minor” (nahawand or būsalik) to “zalzalian” (bayāt tetrachord) with occasional hints of “major” (ʿajam tetrachord) aspects, the latter being underlined by the change in the accompaniment by the cello (from predominant ḥu=a to ja=f=t-bū) at c. 50 s_a.

While the third sub-part (I.III) starts like the first two with a na-ḥu (g-a) call, it concentrates at first (around 60 s_a) on the upper part of the scale with a development of rāst [433] on (c), immediately followed by a reaffirmation of the Ḥusaynī character of the maqām with a hint of rāst [433] on na=g (63 s_a) centered on ḥu=a and with a closing bayāt [334] on =d reaffirming the (lower, around 71 s_a) tonic of the maqām, followed (73 s_a) by a reversed jump from ḥu to na (a to g) and a brisk display of the ascending (from aw to Ja – b to F) then (complete) descending scale, closing (78 s_a) with the (d).

Part II from 83 to 162 s_a (160 to 239 s_v): The different feeling of the second part (beg. 83 s_a) is announced by a jump of fourth from na to (g to c) with a development of the (upper) rāst [=c 433] and a rapid display of the (descending till lower =C) scale stabilizing on (the upper) =c (93-94 s_a), then a variation stabilizing on the (upper) =D with a pentachordal rāst [na=g 4334] closing (108 s_a) the first sub-part II.I. Follows (beg. 110 s_a) the second (II.II) sub-part which consists in an approach of the upper rāst [=c 433] from below the tpps with a beautiful rising then descending portamento from t-Bū=F to Ku=Eb stabilizing on =D after tackling the lower two degrees, and variations in the upper bayāt [=D 33] beg. 120 s_a and a virtuoso display of the (descending then ascending) lower octave + 1 (reaching the lower =C) scale insisting (around 127 s_a) on the unresolved (upper) =c and upper rāst [=c 4334] with a nearly continuous descending portamento from (upper) Ḥu+ (A+) to (lower) ḥu=a (137-140 s_a) which shifts (140 s_a) to a trill between aw=b and =c followed by a very short (in time) ascending bayāt [ḥu=a 334] stabilizing on =D (142 s_a), and a modulation to kurd on ḥu=a [ḥu 244] from 143 to 148 s_a, suddenly modulating (with a change in the accompaniment) to rāst [433] on na stabilizing (149 s_a) on =c, followed (152 s_a) after a short silence by a būsalīk [424] on =d beginning (and insisting) on the central bū=eb, and closing with a double ascending call of fifth from (lower) to na (C to g) then na=g to (upper) =D (155-158 s_a) followed by a descending call of octave and a closing ascending call of fifth (159 s_a) from =d to the stabilized ḥu=a.

Part III: Conclusion from 164 to 188 s_a (241 to 265 s_v): The closing part is initiated by a jump of third (165 s_a) from na (g) to aw+ (≈b) ascending to =D followed by the display in portamento (167-170 s_a) of the descending scale of the maqām till the central (“plagal”) tonic ḥu=a then an ascending pentacordal rāst [4334] on na=g, followed (170-173 s_a) by the descending scale featuring a bū=eb in place of the ja=f, followed (175-183 s_a) by variations between būsalīk [424] and bayāt [334] on =d with a (pre-) final (ascending) call of octave Ḥu-ḥu (A-a) and a final descent (184-187 s_a) from the ḥu=a to the tonic (d at 187-188 s_a).

Imagine: A Scientific Fantasy 2 ‎–‎ A video-analysis in 3D of Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar

This 47th video-analysis of the VIAMAP series is an anniversary video to commemorate the beginning of video-analyses at the CERMAA. It features 3D graphical techniques as well as a short introduction explaining the scale(s) used in the analysis. It is a sequel to the 46th video-analysis –‎ the first in the 3D series –‎ the publication of which is delayed. It is also a 3D remake of the first video-analysis by the CERMAA, featuring an alternate take of Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar and arranged by Richard Dumbrill, Amine Beyhom and Rosy Azar Beyhom in 2012. Further details are explained below (the scale) and in the video as such, as well as in the original post for the first video-analysis.

Explanations about the graphic scale used for the 3D video-analysis of Hurrian Song H6 3D performed by Lara Jokhadar

The last sequence preceding the end credits proposes the following text:

now imagine what it would be if we could apply 3D graphic analysis and animation to all aspects and characteristics of sound; stop, rewind, slow down the music and animation at will, zoom in, zoom out, keep selected characteristics and look up each and all details from the desired point of view and, finally, apply all these to the analysis of multi-part music, with each part shown separately, or together with other parts…

Amine Beyhom, “Imagine A scientific fantasy”

3D video-analysis of Hurrian Song H6 performed by Lara Jokhadar: take 4 recorded on the 21st of October 2012 by Amine Beyhom


A CERMAA production

Video Analysis (https://youtu.be/L2c5-IHOmTc)


NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6&7 available / Mise en ligne de NEMO-Online Vol. 4 n°6&7

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6&7 is now available for downloading (download link below) / NEMO-Online Vol. 4 nos 6&7 est disponible pour téléchargement (lien ci-dessous).

All pdf articles in this volume are available individually at http://nemo-online.org/articles and bookmarked for titles, subtitles and figures / tous les articles au format pdf de ce volume sont téléchargeables individuellement à http://nemo-online.org/articles et contiennent des marque-pages correspondant aux titres, sous-titres et figures.

Note that minor changes in the layout may occur between individual articles and the binded volume, due to the harmonising of the layouts between No. 6 and No. 7 / Les changements mineurs de la mise en page entre articles individuels et volume collaté sont dûs à l’harmonisation entre les deux numéros 6 & 7 suite aux améliorations apportées à partir du n°7.

Hard and soft copy printed versions to follow shortly / Les versions imprimées seront disponibles prochainement.

 

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 contents / contenu / ملخّص :

Editor’s letter / Éditorial / كلمة الناشرين : Evolution, problems and alternate propositions for musicology and ethnomusicology / Évolution, problèmes et proposition alternatives pour musicologie et de l’ethnomusicologie التطوّر، المشاكل والحلول البديلة لعلم الموسيقى (موسيقولوجيا) وعلم الموسيقى
الإثنية (الإتنوموسيقولوجيا)

NEMO-Online No. 6 :

  • Amine Beyhom : “A Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 6 |2017-05| p. 5–88.
  • Richard Dumbrill : “The Truth about Babylonian Music,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 6 |2017-08| p. 91–121.
  • Bruno Deschênes : “A preliminary approach to the analysis of honkyoku, the solo repertoire of the Japanese shakuhachi,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 6 |2017-08| p. 123–143.

 

 NEMO-Online No. 7 :

  • Amine Beyhom“MAT for the VIAMAP – Maqām Analysis Tools for the Video-Animated Music Analysis Project,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 7 |2018-11| p. 145–256.

Vol. 4 Nos. 6&7 (pdf).

Previous volumes / Volumes précédents / الأعداد السابقة /

Note: we use at NEMO-Online the CharisSIL font / nous utilisons à NEMO-Online la police CharisSIL / http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/CharisSIL-4.110.zip / also available at / également téléchargeable à / http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/download_win.html.

(Permalink: http://nemo-online.org/?p=1750)

New article/Dossier: MAT for the VIAMAP – Maqām Analysis Tools for the Video-Animated Music Analysis Project

English

[French translation below]

NEMO-Online is delighted to propose this new article by Amine Beyhom on notational tools and graphical analyses of melody and rythm.

Musical notation has been reputed as disqualified for the analysis of “Foreign” musics since – at least – the experiments of Charles Seeger with the Melograph. It is nevertheless still used as the main analytic – and teaching – tool for these musics in most researches in musicology, and today in the teaching of these musics in autochthonous conservatories. Seeger’s experiments brought at his time cutting-edge solutions – and alternatives – to score notation but, surprisingly enough, these solutions seem to have not worked out very well in the long run.

Beyhom proposes a voluminous dossier including three parts and relying on the pioneering works of Seeger – and other ethnomusicologists – as well as on the improvements of his method that we have witnessed in the last decades. The first part expounds the past, and on-going debates about the (mis-) use of score notation as applied to “Foreign” musics, while the second part offers a retrospective of Maqām music notation. The third part of the dossier describes different tools of pitch and spectrum analysis which help understand – and listen better to the analyzed music while exposing, in fine, the author’s work and propositions for the implementation of video-animated analyses in the teaching of ethnomusicology as one major basis for this teaching. The dossier is accompanied by a short power point show (PPS) and 41 video-animated analyses (total time = 2 h 13 m).

Amine Beyhom: MAT for the VIAMAP – Maqām Analysis Tools for the Video-Animated Music Analysis Project,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 7 |2018-11| p. 145–256.

Français

Nous avons le plaisir à NEMO-Online de publier ce nouvel article par Amine Beyhom sur les outils de notation et d’analyse graphique de la mélodie et du rythme.

La notation musicale est réputée être disqualifiée pour les analyses de musique “étrangères” et ce depuis, au moins, les expériences de Charles Seeger avec le mélographe. Il n’en reste pas moins que la notation classique reste l’outil principal d’analyse de ces musiques dans les recherches musicologiques, et de leur enseignement dans les conservatoires locaux. Les méthodes de Seeger étaient à l’avant-garde de la recherche pour une analyse –  et une notation – alternative des musiques traditionnelles mais, de manière assez surprenante, ne semblent pas avoir pris racine dans l’enseignement de l’ethnomusicologie.

Beyhom propose un dossier volumineux en trois parties, basé sur l’oeuvre pionnière de Seeger – et d’autres ethnomusicologues – ainsi que sur les améliorations de cette méthode apportées au fil des recherches par ses successeurs. La première partie retrace les débats soulevés par l’utilisation (ou non) de la notation musicale classique pour les musique non occidentales – notamment non semi-tonales – tandis que la deuxième partie est consacrée à une courte rétrospective historique de la notation de la musique du maqām. La troisième partie décrit divers outils d’analyse des hauteurs et du spectre d’une mélodie qui sont une aide à l’analyse – et à la compréhension, sinon à une meilleure écoute – de ces musiques. En conclusion l’auteur appelle à implémenter l’enseignement des analyses vidéo-animées de hauteurs dans l’enseignement courant de l’ethnomusicologie, comme outil principal d’analyse des musiques “autres”.

Le dossier est accompagné d’un fichier Power Point contenant quelques exemples d’analyse avec curseur se déplaçant horizontalement sur l’écran, et de 41 analyses vidéo dont le temps total s’élève à 2 heures et 13 minutes.

Amine Beyhom: MAT for the VIAMAP – Maqām Analysis Tools for the Video-Animated Music Analysis Project,” Near Eastern Musicology Online 4 7 |2018-11| p. 145–256.

Release of HURRIAN SONG 6 (H6) by CERMAA (DUMBRILL/BEYHOM/AZAR-BEYHOM) performed by Lara Jokhadar

Release of the first animated video produced at CERMAA.
HURRIAN SONG 6 (H6) was arranged by Richard Dumbrill, Amine Beyhom and Rosy Azar Beyhom in 2012, and performed by Lara Jokhadar.
The video (below) shows the Pitch analysis of Lara’s voice with Praat, in two sections (upper and lower). The upper section offers a general view, while the lower section shows the detailed analysis, with horizontal red dashed lines showing the tonic and the octave, blue dashed line for the fifth and green for the fourth.
Special thanks to Wim van der Meer and to Kabalan Samaha for their help in producing this first video.

Call for Papers for NEMO-Online issue No. 7 (November 2018) and Free download of NEMO-Online 6 articles / Appel à Contributions pour NEMO-Online n°7 et Mise en téléchargement des articles de NEMO-Online n°6

English

Free download of the articles of Nemo-Online Vol. 4 No. 6 below (click for the pdf version on the corresponding title of each article). 

Issue 6 of NEMO-Online and editorial will be available in hard copy and pdf with Issue 7 in Volume 4, November 2018.

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6 & 7 call for papers was: Research groups CERMAA, ICONEA and IReMus are seeking papers for the sixth and seventh issues of NEMO. The theme, continued from the theme of NEMO-Online No. 5 (available here), is about ‘Musicology/Ethnomusicology: evolutions, problems, alternatives’.

This call for papers is sustained for NEMO-Online Vol. 4 No. 7 issue. We would like this issue of NEMO to continue the debate initiated in NEMO-Online No. 5&6 concerning the usefulness of the science, the problems raised due to powerful and contradictory non-scientific characteristics, and the alternatives which may be proposed.

Papers to be sent both to Richard Dumbrill and Amine Beyhom and should follow the editorial layout.

Following the updated editorial policy of NEMO-Online, papers are published as soon as ready during the year preceding the official publication in November of each year, then emendated if necessary for final publication. Papers hold the date of their effective publication besides the date of their official publication (between parentheses). To comply with NEMO-Online publishing policy, and as with all articles of the review since Volume 3, the pdf version includes bookmarks corresponding to the titles, sub-titles, tables and figures, which should help the reader navigate between the different parts of the article.

The Editing Board will consider the publication of papers which might be ‘off subject’ as long as they retain some relationship with the wider theme of the publication.

Deadlines for NEMO-Online No. 7 issue: proposals by end of May 2018 and finalized paper by end of July 2018.

Previous volumes available here, individual articles on the dedicated page (Articles tab) on NEMO-Online website.

 

NEMO-Online 6 contents :

Musicology/Ethnomusicology: evolutions, problems, alternatives (2)

Originally entitled  “A New Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales and their Origins” and published (2010) in the proceedings of ICONEA 2008, this paper has been emendated, updated and enriched, and is reissued for NEMO-Online Vol. 4 No. 6. New research since its first publication presented complementary and sometimes clarifying facts which, with the evolution of terminology (see Beyhom’s “Lexicon” in NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2 – in French, with Appendix L – entitled “Core Glossary” – in this article complementing it), makes it indispensable to publish this new edition. Most of the tables and figures have been reintegrated in the body text, and a dedicated appendix (Appendix G) has been added concerning Octavial scales with limited transposition.

(Adapted) excerpts from the article (Introduction):

The insistence of Mainstream Western Archaeomusicology at force-fitting the Babylonian musical system into the Western model is one of the greatest oversights in the History of music. It came from the methodology (or rather of its absence) of certain Assyriologists and of their determination at spearheading “their discoveries” by means of unsuitable Western models. The manner in which Musical systems are constructed, whether consciously or not, are part of the culture of a people and must be unveiled with the utmost respect and without linkage to theories of later cultures as this would lead to colonialist unification. This article is the consequence of my determined endeavor at academically fostering the proof of the evidence against unproven presumptive inference, and more significantly to assert, scientifically, that heptatonism – which is not universal – is by no means engraved onto mankind’s unconscious. It is a structure, among others, which eventually hatched in the Near-East, as part and consequence of another or other systems, but not as a new, independent and exclusive concept.

Bruno Chikushin (his artist name) Deschênes, a musician and author of a book on the shakuhashi, is a trained shakuhachi player. The aim of his article is to propose a musician’s point of view on the analysis of the honkyoku repertoire. In order to propose another model for understanding this unique music, Deschênes expands on previous authors’ proposals and shows, in the final section, that some of these authors’ conclusions do apply to honkyoku music, while others do not. Although these authors present a relevant understanding of the melodic structure of honkyoku, Deschênes suggests that there is more to it than they propose, specifically highlighting two important aspects of this music that they miss, namely that playing shakuhachi has to do first and foremost with tone-color, not pitches, and that the melodic quality of each phrase and each piece is more in the melodic forms and contours created by the kakuontei and the kakuon than it is in the pitches (see the Glossary at the end of the article).

 

Français

Les articles du numéro 6 de NEMO-Online sont accessibles librement en téléchargement ci-dessous (cliquer sur les titres des articles pour télécharger les pdf).

Le numéro 6 et l’éditorial seront publiés, en version papier et pdf, conjointement avec le Numéro 7 au sein du Volume 4 en (novembre) 2018.

L’appel à contributions pour NEMO-Online Volume 4 nos 6 & 7 était:

Les centres et groupes de recherches CERMAA, ICONEA et IReMus ont le plaisir d’annoncer le thème du Volume 4 de NEMO-Online, nos 6 & 7 : « Musicologies/Ethnomusicologies : évolutions, problèmes, alternatives ». Le thème est la continuation du thème de NEMO-Online no 5, que vous pouvez revoir ici.

Cet appel est maintenu pour NEMO-Online n°7. Nous souhaitons à NEMO que ce numéro prolonge le débat sur l’utilité de la discipline, sur les problèmes suscités par ses caractéristiques fortement (et contradictoirement) a-scientifiques, et, surtout, sur les alternatives qui peuvent être proposées.

Les articles de ce numéro seront publiés au fur et à mesure de leur réception-évaluation-préparation pour la publication internet. NEMO-Online No 7 rassemblera les articles parus et en cours de parution et sera publié en novembre 2018, comme partie du Volume 4 (NEMO-Online Nos 6 & 7).

Langues et normes : voir ici.
Envoi des propositions d’articles à Richard Dumbrill et à Amine Beyhom avant : fin mai 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

Date limite d’envoi des articles : fin juillet 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

La rédaction acceptera également d’examiner des dossiers spéciaux ou des articles hors-thème, du moment qu’ils concernent la thématique générale de la revue.

Les volumes précédents sont disponibles ici, les articles individuels dans l’onglet Articles récemment ajouté sur le site de NEMO-Online.

Contenu du numéro 6 :

Musicologie/Ethnomusicologie: evolutions, problèmes, alternatives (2)

Le titre original de cet article, publié en 2010 après le colloque ICONEA 2008, était “A New Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales and their Origins”. Cette version publiée par NEMO-Online porte le titre, plus concis, “A Hypothesis for the Elaboration of Heptatonic Scales”, l’hypothèse présentée n’étant pas nouvelle (établie en 2003) et toujours non remise en cause dans la littérature musicologique. L’article est corrigé, mis à jour pour la terminologie (voir le “Lexique” de l’auteur dans NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2, avec l’Appendice L – le “Core Glossary” – dans cet article comme complément), et augmenté.  La plupart des tables et figures a été réintégrée dans le texte principal, et l’Appendice G (concernant les échelles à transposition limitée) ajouté, avec son complément Power Point. 

Extraits (adaptés) de l’article (Introduction):

L’acharnement avec lequel la musicologie occidentale a essayé de refondre le système babylonien dans un moule occidental, ne lui convenant pas, est certainement l’expression d’un occicentrisme persistant issu d’une méthodologie, ou plutôt de son absence, parmi les assyriologues et pseudos-musicologues, et de leur acharnement à promouvoir leurs ‘découvertes’ par le moyen de modèles occidentaux inappropriés. La manière dont les systèmes musicaux sont construits, consciemment ou non, fait partie de la culture d’un groupe ‘ethnique’ et doit être dévoilée avec le plus grand respect et sans, à tout prix, les rattacher à des cultures qui leurs sont postérieures car cela équivaudrait à une unification colonialiste. Cet article est la conséquence de ma détermination à produire la preuve des faits contre les présomptions issues d’interprétations, et plus particulièrement de démontrer que l’heptatonisme – qui n’est pas universel – n’est certainement pas gravé dans notre inconscient. C’est une structure, entre d’autres, qui éventuellement eût éclos au Proche-Orient comme partie et comme la conséquence d’un autre ou d’autres systèmes, mais non un système nouveau, indépendant et exclusif.

Bruno Chikushin (de son nom d’artiste japonais) Deschênes, auteur du premier livre en français consacré au shakuhachi, est un musicien de formation. Le but de son article est de proposer une analyse du répertoire solo de honkyoku pour shakuhachi du point de vue du musicien. Afin de proposer un modèle qui devrait permetre de mieux comprendre cette musique unique, Deschênes développe les propositions d’auteurs précédents et montre, dans la dernière section, que certaines conclusions de ces auteurs s’appliquent à la musique honkyoku, alors que d’autres ne s’appliquent pas. Bien que ces auteurs présentent une compréhension pertinente de la structure mélodique de honkyoku, Deschênes suggère qu’il y a plus que ce que leurs analayses proposent, soulignant spécifiquement deux aspects importants de cette musique qui sont absents, à savoir que le jeu du shakuhachi consiste d’abord à mettre de l’avant les timbres musicaux et non les hauteurs, et que la qualité mélodique de chaque phrase et de chaque pièce est plus dans les formes mélodiques et les contours créés par les kakuontei (intervalle nucélaire) et les kakuon (note nucléaire) que dans les hauteurs proprement dites (voir aussi le glossaire à la fin de l’article).

 

(Permalink: http://nemo-online.org/archives/1692)

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6 & 7 : Call for papers / Appel à contributions

English

NEMO-Online Vol. 4 Nos. 6 & 7 : Call for papers

Research groups CERMAA, ICONEA and IReMus are seeking papers for the sixth and seventh issues of NEMO. The theme, continued from the theme of NEMO-Online No. 5 (available here), is about ‘Musicology/Ethnomusicology: evolutions, problems, alternatives’.

We would like these issues of NEMO to continue the debate initiated in NEMO-Online No. 5 concerning the usefulness of the science, the problems raised due to powerful and contradictory non-scientific characteristics, and the alternatives which may be proposed.

Papers to be sent both to Richard Dumbrill and Amine Beyhom and should follow the editorial layout.

Papers will be published on the site as preliminary versions as soon as they are evaluated, corrected and prepared for Internet publication; NEMO-Online issue No. 6 to be published as a whole in November 2017, NEMO-Online issue No. 7 to be published, along with complete Vol. 4 (NEMO-Online 6&7), in November 2018.

The Editing Board will consider the publication of papers which might be ‘off subject’ as long as they retain some relationship with the wider theme of the publication.

Deadlines: proposals by end of June 2017 and finalized paper by end of August 2017 for NEMO-Online No. 6, by end of May 2018 and finalized paper by end of July 2018 for NEMO-Online No. 7.

Previous volumes available here, individual articles on the dedicated page (new Articles tab) on NEMO-Online website.

 

Français

Appel à contributions pour NEMO-Online Volume 4 nos 6 & 7

Les centres et groupes de recherches CERMAA, ICONEA et IReMus ont le plaisir d’annoncer le thème du Volume 4 de NEMO-Online, nos 6 & 7 : « Musicologies/Ethnomusicologies : évolutions, problèmes, alternatives ». Le thème est la continuation du thème de NEMO-Online no 5, que vous pouvez revoir ici.

Nous souhaitons à NEMO que les deux numéros de ce quatrième volume prolongent le débat sur l’utilité de la discipline, sur les problèmes suscités par ses caractéristiques fortement (et contradictoirement) a-scientifiques, et, surtout, sur les alternatives qui peuvent être proposées.

Les articles des ces deux numéros seront publiés au fur et à mesure de leur réception-évaluation-préparation pour la publication internet. NEMO-Online No 6 rassemblera les articles parus et en cours de parution et sera publié en Novembre 2017; de même pour NEMO-Online No 7 en novembre 2018, comme partie du Volume 4 (NEMO-Online Nos 6 & 7).

Langues et normes : voir ici.
Envoi des propositions d’articles à Richard Dumbrill et à Amine Beyhom avant : fin juin 2017 pour NEMO-Online No 6 et fin mai 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

Date limite d’envoi des articles : fin août 2017 pour NEMO-Online No 6 et fin juillet 2018 pour NEMO-Online No 7.

La rédaction acceptera également d’examiner des dossiers spéciaux ou des articles hors-thème, du moment qu’ils concernent la thématique générale de la revue.

Les volumes précédents sont disponibles ici, les articles individuels dans l’onglet Articles récemment ajouté sur le site de NEMO-Online.

 

Permalink : http://nemo-online.org/?p=1550.

NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 and Vol. 2 Nos. 2&3 : Reissue 2016/12

(click on the title of each article for the corresponding pdf version / cliquer sur les titres des articles pour télécharger les pdf).

The redaction of NEMO-Online is pleased to announce the reissue of NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 and NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2&3 as individual articles / La rédaction de NEMO-Online a le plaisir d’annoncer une nouvelle édition de NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 et NEMO-Online Vol. 2 No. 2&3 en articles individuels.

Reminder / Rappel: NEMO-Online Vol. 3 No. 4&5 / is available / est disponible (November 2016).

NEMO-Online Vol. 1 No. 1 Reissue 2016/12 : (all pdf articles in this volume are bookmarked for titles and subtitles / tous les articles au format pdf de ce volume contiennent des marque-pages correspondant aux titres et sous-titres)

Editor’s letter / Éditorial / كلمة الناشرين : Questioning Modality / La modalité en question / بخصوص المقامية

Contents / contenu / ملخّص :

  • Richard Dumbrill :Modus Vivendi”, NEMO-Online 1 1 |2012-11| p. 89–116.

 

NEMO-Online Vol. 2 Nos. 2&3 Reissue 2016/12 : (all pdf articles in this volume are bookmarked for titles, subtitles and figures / tous les articles au format pdf de ce volume contiennent des marque-pages correspondant aux titres, sous-titres et figures)

Editor’s letter / Éditorial / كلمة الناشرين : Modality and Musical Myths / Modalité et mythes musicaux / المقامية والخرافات الموسيقية

Contents / contenu / ملخّص :

 

 

Volumes / Volumes / الأعداد /

Note: we use at NEMO-Online the CharisSIL font / nous utilisons à NEMO-Online la police CharisSIL http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/CharisSIL-4.110.zip, also available at / également téléchargeable à http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/download_win.html. Specialized fonts may also be used in individual articles / Des polices spécialisées sont parfois utilisées dans certains articles.

(Permalink: http://nemo-online.org/?p=1557)















NEMO-Online Vol. 3 Nos. 4&5 available / Mise en ligne de NEMO-Online Vol. 3 n°4&5

(click on the title of each article for the corresponding pdf version / cliquer sur les titres des articles pour télécharger les pdf).

NEMO-Online Vol. 3 : (all pdf articles in this volume are bookmarked for titles, subtitles and figures / tous les articles au format pdf de ce volume contiennent des marque-pages correspondant aux titres, sous-titres et figures)

Editor’s letter / Éditorial / كلمة الناشرين : Instrumental facture & Evolution of musicology and ethnomusicology / Facture instrumentale & Évolution de la musicologie et de l’ethnomusicologie / صناعة الآلات وتطوّر علم الموسيقولوجيا والإتنوموسيقولوجيا

NEMO-Online No. 4 contents / contenu / ملخّص : Instrumental facture from its sources in the Ancient Near East to modern times / La facture instrumentale au Moyen-Orient, des origines à nos jours / صناعة الآلات الموسيقية في الشرق الأوسط، من البدايات وحتى يومنا هذا

 

NEMO-Online No. 5 contents / contenu / ملخّص : Musicology and Ethnomusicology: evolutions and problems / Musicologies et Ethnomusicologies : évolutions et problèmes / الموسيقولوجيا والإتنوموسيقولوجيا، التطوّر والمشاكل

Complete / Vol. 3 Nos. 4&5 / complet (pdf) (hard copy/imprimé).

Previous volumes / Volumes précédents / الأعداد السابقة /

Note: we use at NEMO-Online the CharisSIL font / nous utilisons à NEMO-Online la police CharisSIL http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/CharisSIL-4.110.zip, also available at / également téléchargeable à http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/download_win.html.

(Permalink: http://nemo-online.org/?p=1460)

 

 

Public presentation of Amine Beyhom’s book on Byzantine chant – Orient Institut Beirut – 16th February 2016

Amine Beyhom will present his new book on Byzantine chant (and animating a seminar On priests and modes. Or how the author finally got to understand Byzantine chant theory and praxis) in the Orient Institut Beirut on the 16th of February 2016 (from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. – please see details on http://www.orient-institut.org/index.php?id=12 – pick “16th February”; contact, address and map available at http://www.orient-institut.org/index.php?id=58).

Mīkhāʾīl Mashāqa (1800-1888) was the first known modern theoretician of music to explain in written form the 24-quartertones system that was to become a standard in most Arabian countries. The lecture will reflect briefly how the personal development of this historian was closely bound with the history of the Middle East in the 19th century before shedding light on his musicological writings which, unlike other theories of Arabian music, compare the latter with the theories of Byzantine chant, namely the system of Chrysanthos of Madytos (1770-1846), who was the leader of the first “modern” reform of the Byzantine orthodox chant. This characteristic of Mashāqa’s treatise on music led the speaker to a thorough research on the two Patriarchal reforms of the 19th century.

It will be therefore shown how the theory of Chrysanthos is related to other Eastern theories like the Indian śruti system or the maqāmāt of Shihāb al-Dīn al-Ḥijāzī. At the same time, this reading will be contrasted  to Western musicological theorieson Eastern chant and their focus on Hellenistic rereading of Ancient Greek theories which, apart from trying to reduce Byzantine chant to a by-product of Western music, became the main tool of Orientalist studies on the music of the Middle East.

The presentation includes audio excerpts/analyses and liveʿūd examples.

This seminar / presentation, based on Amine Beyhom’s new book on Théories byzantines de l᾽échelle et pratiques du chant byzantin arabe, published 2015 (see: http://foredofico.org/CERMAA/archives/584) and co-organized with the Centre de Recherches sur les Musiques Arabes et Apparentées, is placed under the Auspices of the Ministry of Culture in Lebanon.